Census Dates

5% of the population don’t appear in a census.
Ages can be at least 1-2 years out.

1841    6th June            Available
The relationship to the head of the house was NOT recorded. Children under the age of 15 had their precise ages recorded while those aged 15 and above had theirs rounded down to the nearest five.

Information requested: Name of street, place, road, etc.; House number or name; Name of each person that had spent the night in that household; Age; Sex; Profession or occupation; Where born.

1851    30th March       Available
In 1851, householders were asked to give more precise details of the places of birth of each resident, to state their relationship to him or her, marital status and the nature of any disabilities from which they may have suffered.

Information requested: Name of street, place, road, etc.; House number or name; Name of each person that had spent the night in that household; Relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family; Person's marital status; Age at last birthday; Person's rank, profession, or occupation; Person's place of birth; Whether blind, deaf, or idiot.

1861    7th April           Available
Between 5% and 10% of the 1861 census is missing.
Information requested: Name of road, street, etc; House number or name; Whether or not the house was inhabited; Name of each person that had spent the night in that household; Relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family; Person's marital status; Age at last birthday; Person's occupation; Person's place of birth; Whether blind, deaf, or idiot.

1871    2nd April          Available
Information requested on the census included: Address (name of the street, avenue, or road; house number); Occupant (name of each person who spent the night in the house; their birthplace and relationship to head of family); Residence (whether home was inhabited; number of rooms occupied); Personal (sex, age, marital status); Occupation (whether employer, employee, or neither); Health (whether blind, deaf, dumb, imbecile, idiot, or lunatic).

1881    3rd April           Available
Information requested: Name of street, avenue road, etc.; House number or name; Whether or not the house was inhabited; Number of rooms occupied if less than five; Name of each person that had spent the night in that household; Relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family; Each person's marital status; Age at last birthday; Each person's occupation; Person's place of birth; Whether deaf and dumb, blind, imbecile or idiot, or lunatic

1891    5th April           Available
Information requested: Name of street, avenue road, etc.; house number or name; whether or not the house was inhabited; number of rooms occupied if less than five; name of each person that had spent the night in that household; relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family; each person's marital status; age at last birthday (sex is indicated by which column the age is recorded in); each person's occupation; whether they are employer or employee or neither; person's place of birth; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or lunatic.

1901    31st March       Available
Information requested: Name of street, avenue road, etc.; house number or name; whether or not the house was inhabited; number of rooms occupied if less than five; name of each person that had spent the night in that household; relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family; each person's marital status; age at last birthday (sex is indicated by which column the age is recorded in); each person's occupation; whether they are employer or employee or neither; person's place of birth; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or lunatic.

1911    2nd April          Available
The 1911 census was taken on the 2nd April and contains millions more records than the previous 1901 census. This is the first available census to be filled in by your ancestors, enabling you to view your ancestor’s handwriting.

The 1911 is thought to be one of the most important record sets as it will show family records in detail before the WW1. It will give details of where your ancestors lived, who with, age, place of birth and occupation as you would expect.

Additional pieces of information included for the first time are nationality, duration of current marriage, number of children born within that marriage,  number of living children and the number of any children who had died. Extra occupation information may show details of the industry in which they worked.
  • The 1911 Census is the first census where the original forms were kept.
  • The handwriting on the original image is that of your ancestor.
  • This is the first census to record full details of British Army personnel stationed overseas.
  • This census asks women how long they had been married and how many children they had (including how many that had died).
The most important innovation made in 1911 was the use of the census to obtain more detailed information bearing on the fertility of marriage. The 1911 Census was also the first in which machines were used for purposes of tabulation in Great Britain. A significant consequence of the introduction of machinery was that it enabled the results of the census to be presented in greater detail than could ever have been attempted before.

Because the 100-year closure rule was established after the 1911 census, information in later censuses will not be released until the dates stated.

1921    Sunday 19th June (Planned Publication Date 1st January 2022)

1931    Sunday 26th April
Destroyed in a fire in 1941. The Scottish Census survived as it was stored in Edinburgh.

1939    Friday 29th September (Available 2nd November 2015)
World War II National Registration
Following this census every man, woman and child had to carry an identity (ID) card at all times and the cards would include the following information:
·         Name
·         Sex
·         Age
·         Occupation, profession, trade or employment
·         Address; Marital status
·         Membership of Naval, Military or Air Force Reserves or Auxiliary Forces or of Civil Defence Services or Reserves.
65,000 enumerators across the country delivered forms ahead of the chosen day. On 29 September 1939, householders were required to record details on the registration forms. On the following Sunday and Monday the enumerators visited every householder, checked the form and there and then issued a completed identity card for each of the residents. All cards at this time were the same brown/buff colour.
Three main reasons for their introduction:
·        The major dislocation of the population caused by mobilisation and mass evacuation and also the wartime need for complete manpower control and planning in order to maximise the efficiency of the war economy.
·        The likelihood of rationing (introduced from January 1940 onwards).
·        Population statistics. As the last census had been held in 1931, there was little accurate data on which to base vital planning decisions. The National Register was in fact an instant census and the National Registration Act closely resembles the 1920 Census Act in many ways.

1941   No Census taken due to World War II.

1951    8th April (Planned Publication Date 1st January 2052)

1961    23rd April (Planned Publication Date 1st January 2062).

1971    25th April (Planned Publication Date 1st January 2072).

1981    5th April (Planned Publication Date 1st January 2082).

1991    21st April (Planned Publication Date 1st January 2092).

2001    29th April (Planned Publication Date 1st January 2102).

2011    27th March (Planned Publication Date 1st January 2112).

V3 14th August 2016